Our Outreach Specialist, Izzy , attended the Content Marketing Show held at London’s Institute of Education this past Thursday, July 17th. Here is her report of the day!

london-euston

I arrived at London Euston on a particularly beautiful day in the capital. After a short walk, I arrived at the Institute of Education, where the Content Marketing Show would be taking place. Fortunately I arrived early, so I had a chance to rub shoulders with some of the other guests of the show. I met Jonny and Tom from Idio, a SaaS (Software as a Service) company who focus on bringing brands and customers closer together. They were at the conference to show their new platform for content measuring (compiling facts and figures on what content is working, and what isn’t), something that could be invaluable to the content maker.

content marketing show

 

I also met  Harriet and Lynsey from Distilled, who make some awesome creative content. It was while I was speaking to these two girls that the doors to the show opened.

The show took place in a lecture theatre within the institute. After everybody had taken their seats, Stephen Waddington took to the stage first. Hailing from Ketchum, he pondered the question “Can a brand ever truly be social?”. He pointed out that social media is a human media,so automating it should be done with “extreme care”.

Jojo from Grayling talked about data research as a way of creating content. The thrust of the presentation was that the internet is a vast pool of knowledge, statistics and facts – it is up to the content creator to farm it and produce a story from these resources. This type of advice can really help a young content creator get going in his or her respective career. Jojo was followed by Fergus Parker, who looked back at the last 6 months in content marketing. He highlights successes such as the Twitter trend #GiveGregAHoliday , and Ford’s Mother’s Day “dream car” advertising campaign. He implored those at the show to make content which has an audience, while at the same time not selling yourself. , and Ford’s Mother’s Day “dream car” advertising campaign. He implored those at the show to make content which has an audience, while at the same time not selling yourself.

Before intermission, Joseph from Simply Business brought up a problem that faces all content creators at some point – writing content for “boring” industries. He put forward plenty of solutions for this common problem, chief among which was going big with ideas. If the sector is naturally a little bland, you’ll need to go big to catch any attention, so think outside the box next time you’re stuck in this situation!

Andrew Tipp came with a different perspective to the whole online marketing game – treating it like a game of poker. Drawing comparisons between a poker player’s lack of total knowledge of a situation and the similar situation a marketer will find themselves in, he preached using the facts you have to hand to create the best content you can. He also stressed that every poker game is different, just as the media landscape is always changing, so it’s important to stay flexible, and realise that just because something used to work, it won’t necessarily work again.came with a different perspective to the whole online marketing game – treating it like a game of poker. Drawing comparisons between a poker player’s lack of total knowledge of a situation and the similar situation a marketer will find themselves in, he preached using the facts you have to hand to create the best content you can. He also stressed that every poker game is different, just as the media landscape is always changing, so it’s important to stay flexible, and realise that just because something used to work, it won’t necessarily work again.

Chelsea from BlueGlass would expand on this poker analogy later on in the show, linking everyone to this infographic: the Psychology of Lying.

Up next, Steve from Redrocket made some really interesting points about the power of interviews as a tool to create content. He said taking a journalistic approach (plenty of research, a personable approach, and a slant towards humour whenever possible) can get results out of people from even the most bland and boring of industries.

content marketing show

We had an hour and a half for lunch, so I chose to explore my favourite city and take a few pictures.

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Videos were the next topic of discussion, with the Raph Goldberg from Tangwood talking about “the heroes journey”, an archetypal story very prevalent in fiction. Think Star Wars, Lord of the Ring etc. – one hero that overcomes many odds in order to succeed, growing as a human along the way. He said this well known story translates well into advertising videos, because it is so well known and understood. It can’t be used as a crutch though – content creators must ask themselves what would make them want to watch a video, and what how do they want the viewer to respond. Asking such questions and producing good video content could be highly beneficial, as videos are 53 times more likely to get to the front page than standard text articles!

From videos we moved on to inter-blog relationships. In today’s interconnected world, these relationships can make or break a blog, so Marcin of EF Englishtown suggested those aspiring to get ahead in the blogosphere utilise many different avenues in the search for relationships – be that online or offline, such as social gatherings. All of this should be in place before “favours” should be asked, as people you are friends with are more likely to help you than those you are simply using to gain more links.

Charlie Williams of White Dot Net brought up a very important point in the penultimate presentation: what’s the point of all of this content if there is no strategy in place to get the most out of it? He brought up the alarming stat while 88% of the SEO industry uses content marketing, only 42% have a strategy. He instructed us to have this strategy in place well before any content is created, so that all content created can be focused and purposeful, instead of created “for the sake of it” .

Finally, Lisa Mayer CEO of Verve Search, took to the stage to talk about improving productivity in the workplace where all of the content is being creative. Far from the typical “everyone should get along” speech we have all heard before, she actually said it’s good for people to argue! Her reasoning was that if everyone feels comfortable saying what they think, even if it provokes heated responses, is good for a company, as it allows everyone to express themselves and feel valued.

Overall, the show was a fantastic event that covered literally everything relating to content marketing. No stone was left unturned by the time I left to go and enjoy a few drinks with my fellow attendees. I had just enough time to talk to Chandreyi, from Skyline telecom, before jumping back on the train and heading back to Birmingham, brimming with great ideas to bring back and implement at Bootcamp Media. I hope you have taken away similar lessons from this article!